Is misophonia linked to autism?

Autism light sensitivity

The disease is not classified as a discrete disorder in the DSM-5 or ICD-10 ; however, a 2013 study by three psychiatrists at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam on 42 patients with misophonia suggests its classification as a separate mental disorder. Studies are ongoing to determine whether it is a separate disorder.

The polyvagal theory, proposed by American psychiatrist Stephen Porges, suggests that misophonia may be an autonomic response of the central nervous system. Sounds of bodily origin, which have a specific modulation and frequency, being associated with a state of alertness.

A link has been suggested between misophonia and synesthesia, a neurological condition in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic and involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. The basic problem may be a pathological distortion of the connections between the various limbic structures and the auditory cortex, causing sound-emotion synesthesia. Some people suffer from both misophonia and synesthesia. Many people with synesthesia have various forms; more than sixty types of synesthesia have been reported.

Asperger’s and noise

The acceptance phase: it is only after some time, observing that the more they gradually enrich their sound environment, the more their hyperacusis progressively worsens, that they accept their hyperacusis as well as the absence of a really effective therapy. and the obligation to protect themselves against noise that increases their pain as well as to limit their actions, professional activities, outings, leisure and social relationships.[7] In 1987, Jack Vernon defined hyperacusis as a marked intolerance of a person to a normal sound environment, when in fact their hearing thresholds are normal (without normal hearing loss).

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In 1987, Jack Vernon defined hyperacusis as a marked intolerance of a person to a normal sound environment, when in fact their hearing thresholds are normal (no significant hearing loss).[8] In 1987, Jack Vernon defined hyperacusis as a marked intolerance of a person to a normal sound environment, when in reality their hearing thresholds are normal (no significant hearing loss).[8

Symptoms are ear pain, discomfort, distortion, and general intolerance to many sounds that do not affect most people. Episodes of crying or panic attacks occur. It may affect one or both ears.[14] A major cause may be hearing loss.

One of the main causes may be hearing loss, with some researchers suggesting that the brain tries to compensate for that hearing loss by balancing the hearing volume by causing it to increase.[15] The brain may also try to compensate for the hearing loss by increasing the volume of hearing.[15] The brain may also try to compensate for the hearing loss by increasing the volume of hearing.

Visual hypersensitivity autism

This is a neurological disorder since it is related to the extreme interpretation that our brain makes of auditory stimuli due to a physiological deviation of the hearing system.

The symptoms that explain misophonia are based on extreme and/or exaggerated reactions to specific sounds emitted in normal situations and contexts. Some examples of these sounds that are usually banal are:

It is not a phobia towards noises but is based on a reaction of involuntary rejection towards certain sounds coming from outside or from the people around them. For this reason, it is common for those who suffer from misophonia to feel misunderstood by their environment because their disproportionate response to these sounds is not perceived as normal and often causes rejection and discomfort and even problems of coexistence in cases of high degree misophonia.

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Misophonia can and should be treated so that it does not become a disabling disorder, causing a disease situation due to the inability to lead a normal life.

Misophonia autism

It is a neurological disease in which certain sounds cause anxiety, panic or anger, a response of disproportionate intensity of the autonomic nervous system and the limbic system to certain “normal” sounds, with an abnormal hyperactivation of the auditory system.

However, those affected have developed various strategies to cope with different situations in their daily lives, which often include exclusion from social life.

I have collected some phrases from comments in some forums of the pages linked below in the sources of this article, in order to bring closer to all those who are lucky enough not to suffer from misophonia the feelings of those who do have this misfortune.

I am especially crazy about people who make any noise while eating and especially the noise of cutlery and crockery in general… I can’t stand it when they spin the coffee or when the cutlery collides with the plate. I feel like my head is going to explode… I get anxious and I don’t know what to do.

Is misophonia linked to autism?
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