What are telescopic AIDS?

What are telescopic AIDS?

Human immunodeficiency virus pdf 2018

HIV was discovered and considered to be the agent of the nascent AIDS epidemic by Luc Montagnier’s team in France in 1983. The virion is spherical, enveloped and with a protein capsid. Its genome is a single-stranded RNA strand that must be provisionally copied to DNA in order to multiply and integrate into the genome of the cell it infects. The protein antigens of the outer envelope are specifically coupled to membrane proteins of infectious cells, especially CD4 T-lymphocytes.

There are two types of HIV, called HIV-1 and HIV-2. The former corresponds to the originally discovered virus, which was given the names LAV and HTLV-III by the two teams that were investigating the etiological agent of AIDS during the first half of the 1980’s. HIV-1 is more virulent than HIV-2. HIV-1 is more virulent and infectious than HIV-2[13] and causes the majority of HIV infections worldwide. HIV-2 is less infectious and is almost exclusively confined to West African countries.[14] HIV-1 is more virulent and infectious than HIV-2[15] and causes the majority of HIV infections worldwide.

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A picture suggestive of lower respiratory tract infection and a new pulmonary infiltrate on chest X-ray is required, always considering other processes, especially when there are important extrapulmonary manifestations, atypical radiological patterns and poor response to antibiotics (atelectasis, pulmonary infarction, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, eosinophilic pneumonias, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, drug-induced pneumonitis, post-radiation pneumonitis, alveolar proteinosis and others).

In a series of 225 patients from our Hospital, the etiological diagnosis was obtained in 45% of the cases, the most frequent germs being pneumococcus (10%), Chlamydia sp. (7%) and M. tuberculosis (7%), followed by Legionella sp. (4%), Coxiella burnetti (3%), H. influenzae (3%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (1%), S. aureus (1%) and others. Aspiration was diagnosed in 3%.

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Telescopic catheter or BAL, considering transthoracic puncture in non-intubated patients. To be considered in patients with severe pneumonia and risk of suffering an unusual etiology (elderly, chronic diseases), who have not responded to correct empirical treatment, with radiological alterations suggestive of an unusual process (cavitation) or pneumonia in patients with severe immunodeficiency and in whom non-invasive techniques do not allow an etiological diagnosis.

Books on AIDS

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a viral infection that progressively destroys certain white blood cells. If left untreated, it usually leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Transmission of HIV requires contact with body fluids containing the virus or cells infected with the virus. Which of the following is not a body fluid that commonly transmits HIV?

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a viral infection that progressively destroys certain white blood cells. If left untreated, it usually leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Transmission of HIV requires contact with body fluids containing the virus or cells infected with the virus. Which of the following is not a body fluid that commonly transmits HIV?

AIDS pdf 2020

AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and defines the series of symptoms and infections that are associated with acquired immune system deficiency. HIV infection is considered the underlying cause of AIDS. The level of immunodeficiency and the occurrence of certain infections are used as indicators of whether HIV infection has progressed and caused AIDS (see question 4).

HIV infection causes progressive depletion and weakening of the immune system. This leads to increased susceptibility of the body to infections and cancers and can lead to the development of AIDS (see questions 2 and 4).

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AIDS is identified on the basis of certain infections. Stage I HIV disease is asymptomatic and is not considered AIDS. Stage II (includes mild candidiasis and frequent upper respiratory tract infections), stage III (includes chronic unexplained diarrhea persisting for more than one month, various bacterial infections and pulmonary tuberculosis) and stage IV HIV disease (includes cerebral toxoplasmosis, candidiasis of the esophagus, trachea or lungs and Kaposi’s sarcoma) are used as indicators of AIDS. Most of these conditions are easily treatable opportunistic infections in healthy individuals.

What are telescopic AIDS?
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